Monthly Archives: July 2016

PRC mtg Aug 1st

I haven’t read a lot of newsletters but I’ve seen far too many that start out with, “I can’t believe it’s ________ already.”  You fill in the month. It’s purely cliche writing and far over used.  But I will admit that I could have used it today. It seems that the summer is really flying by.  I hope yours is going well and and that you’re getting everything done you intended.

We’re still collecting photos from Field Day. If you have some on your camera please try to get them to me soon. We’ll be publishing them soon.


Let’s talk antennas

Summer is, of course, antenna time.  At the August 1st meeting we’ll have an open discussion of  various antenna designs and construction ideas. I’ve been working on a 10 meter experimental loop with a homemade balun and will be bringing the essentials for show and tell.  If you have an antenna project you can bring, please do. We’d love to see it. On a recent net the question as to whether painting an antenna is a good idea.  What do you think?

By the way, I’ve learned to call most of my antennas “experimental.” There are several reasons for this. First, it makes it sound like I’m a scientist and who would question science? Also it suggests t0 family and curious neighbors that it’s temporary and they won’t have to look at it forever. I don’t know if it buys me any extra time, but I think it discourages some comments like “What the hell is that?”

Bring yourself, ideas and show and tell items to the next meeting. You’ll be glad you did.


Powder Time

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Thanks to Mark Huber, N8OJ for his recent demonstration of powder coating.  In his demo, Mark coated an old aluminum worklight shade from host Rich Balata, KD8KBO. Powder coating differs from paint in that the powder is not suspended in a solvent. In the powder coating process, the colored powder is electrostatically charged while being blown onto the work piece from a special gun. Then the item is heated in a 400 degree convection oven for 20 minutes. The work can be handled as soon as it cools.  The result is impressive appearance and very durable. Great for ham projects!


Hal Rogers, K8CMD

President, Communications Director